Pianist

Michal Gajzler

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About Michal

Pianist
Glasgow
Michal is a passionate piano accompanist experienced in opera, art song and chamber music.

Michał Gajzler, born and raised in Poland, recently graduated with an MMus in repetiteurship at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland's Alexander Gibson Opera School. In 2010 he graduated with an MMus in piano performance at the Cracow Academy of Music and MA in musicology at the Jagiellonian University (Cracow). In 2013 Michał moved to Scotland where he has taken up position at the Aria Alba - Opera for All as a piano accompanist following year. He's operatic experience includes performing Die Zauberflöte on piano (Aria Alba in 2014 and Lyric Opera Studio Weimar in 2015), Le Nozze di Figaro (as a pianist for VoiceArc and as a continuo-player for the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland), Così fan tutte (VoiceArc), Die Fledermaus (Aria Alba) Les mamelles de Tirésias as a pianist in two pianos arrangement by Benjamin Britten (RCS), The Bear (RCS) and Owen Wingrave (RCS) as well as opera scenes from the Hänsel und Gretel, Arabella, Werther, Pelléas et Mélisande, The Rake's Progress, Tancredi, Die Lustigen Weiber von Windsor, La Rondine and Der Rosenkavalier. Michał also appeared as a pianist at the Oxford Lieder Spring Weekend of Song. Future engagements include Don Giovanni (VoiceArc), Ariadne auf Naxos (VoiceArc) and Semele (Aria Alba). Michał also works as a piano accompanist and vocal coach for singers and choirs in Glasgow area.

Performance details
I can perform outdoors
I have my own portable piano/keyboard
Musicianship
Genres:
Classical, Opera, Contemporary classical, Baroque, Classical crossover, Musical theatre
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Instruments:
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Event types:
Wedding, Wedding proposal, Church service, Hotel / Restaurant event, Private event
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Other skills:
Repetiteur, Fluent sight-reader, Perfect pitch, Instrumental teaching, Theory teaching
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Reviews

From customers:

Bachtrack.com, 4 years ago

The recitatives, where most of the story happens, are usually fast moving and difficult and I was particularly impressed by Michal Gajzler whose lightest of touches on the fortepiano threw the focus right back onto the stage, yet was enough to support these critical links.